Why a vote for Hillary is a vote for Trump

I'm writing this in reply to this article shared by my now favorite podcast, Pantsuit Politics. The author makes this statement:

"But when voters are asked about Bernie’s positions, rather than his name, the numbers are brutal. In a Gallup Poll taken last June, fully 50 percent said they would not vote for a socialist. Some 40 percent said they’d never vote for an atheist, which Bernie also basically is. Most of those are probably Republican voters anyway, but many are the swing voters in the seven states that will likely determine this election. (This is not like Obama in 2004: Only 7 percent of Americans said they would not vote for an African American to be president.)"

But I want to point out 2 problems with that statement. One, a poll from June 2016, less than a month after Bernie Sanders announced his presidential bid, is about as reliable now as a poll from 2000. We have come a long way since then, and the demographics that made up that poll, even the non-republicans, are not an accurate representation of field of voters we have now in Feb. 2016. Two, since Bernie's campaign launched, he has had an unprecedented level of young voter support, with Bernie taking 83% of voters 18-29, and 66% of voters 30-44 in New Hampshire's primary. If you asked people a year ago about democratic socialism, they likely wouldn't have had any idea what you were talking about, and more than likely associated socialism with communism, incorrectly. But poll that same group now, and I'll bet you get a different response after learning about what it actually means from Bernie Sanders' campaign.

I think the media is discrediting the impact young voters are going to have on this election as a whole. If we go back eight years ago to the Obama/Clinton race, the world was a very different place. We had FaceBook and Twitter, yes, but they were not used as tools to communicate to voters the way social media is now. Look at any campaign, and you'll see them using FaceBook, Twitter, Snapchat, etc to reach young voters. I think it's safe to say more young voters engaged and interested in this election than ever before. And here's the rub for people who have been through this before: young voters don't have years of entrenchment to a political party. Until last year, I was a registered Libertarian. This year, after moving and discovering Bernie Sanders, I re-registered as a Democrat. Young voters, including myself, are more interested in hearing politicians talk about issues rather than hearing arguments about who's the party's more electable candidate.

Now, let's set the stage, Bernie v Trump in the general election. Trump has garnered huge amounts of support despite bucking the trend of campaigning on every front, he even went so far as to criticize George W. Bush while in South Carolina, and it had no affect on the polls. His supporters are going to go with him, no matter what. Similarly, Bernie has amassed a YUGE supporter base of people who are fed up with politics as usual, and who are being inspired to take a more active role in deciding the future of our country. If these two are in the 2016 General Election, we will have the largest voter turnout in history. Hillary supporters will be upset, but I guarantee they will not be jumping ship for the Donald. They'll vote for Bernie, just like more moderate Republicans will begrudgingly vote for Trump out of fear of Bernie's socialist campaign. I'm not sure where independents will go, from what I've heard at the Primaries, some fall to Bernie, some to Trump, depending on where they stand on their social and economic views. 

But, if the RNC doesn't nominate Trump, he's already threatened to run as an independent. If the DNC doesn't dominate Bernie, his supporters will plead with him to do the same. And in both cases, you'll have a large chunk of voters from both parties following their candidate, because remember, we're not beholden to a political party, we've picked our candidate and we're sticking with them. Could either party really afford to lose those voters? With the Democrats showing near 50/50 split among it's voters in national polls right now, could they really afford to lose 40-50% of their voters if it was Hillary v Trump v Bernie?

The only way I see the Democrats winning with Hillary as the nominee is if somehow Trump also does not get the nomination. I think the RNC and DNC have kind of backed themselves into a corner here. The voters are speaking, and they're saying that we want candidates who are not your typical politician, we want big changes to fix the economy, to fix campaign finance, to fix inequality, etc. If we see Hillary / Bush dominations, I seriously think we'll see Bernie and Trump running as independents, and the 2016 election will be even crazier than it already is.

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Bryn Behrenshausen

I'm an Information Technology Specialist currently residing in Williamsport, Pennsylvania. I have a passion for integrating technology into people's daily lifestyle and the education process. I believe technology drives innovation and change, for better or worse, but regardless, something will be learned from it. I follow Apple products very closely, but am also very familiar with Windows consumer and Server platforms. Over the past few years I have been developing my enterprise network skills by being exposed to networks running Juniper, Cisco, 3Com, and other network devices, giving me a diverse knowledge of network equipment. I am working to specialize in Network Engineering but retain my passion for new and innovative consumer products, i.e. iPads, iPhones, MacBooks, etc. I, like Steve Jobs, get excited about the convergence of the liberal arts and technology, in order to benefit the average person. I have had the great opportunity to work in environments that give me the opportunity to meet and work with many different kinds of people and deal with drastically different kinds of technology problems, all helping to develop my troubleshooting skills, people skills, and professional development while on the clock.

What's in a name?

Want to hear something funny about my family? Check this out:

My grandfather's name is Bernard.
My uncle's name is Bernie.
My cousins' names (sons of Bernie) are Bryan and Brent.
My name is Bryn (pronounced Brin).

In 2007 Bryan married Kate (Kathryn).
In 2014 Bryn (me) married Katie (Katelyn).
At the end of 2015, we will be celebrating the marriage of Brent to Kaitlyn (Katie)!

So, it'll be: Bryan & Kate, Bryn & Katie, Brent & Katie

How cool is that?!

Comment

Bryn Behrenshausen

I'm an Information Technology Specialist currently residing in Williamsport, Pennsylvania. I have a passion for integrating technology into people's daily lifestyle and the education process. I believe technology drives innovation and change, for better or worse, but regardless, something will be learned from it. I follow Apple products very closely, but am also very familiar with Windows consumer and Server platforms. Over the past few years I have been developing my enterprise network skills by being exposed to networks running Juniper, Cisco, 3Com, and other network devices, giving me a diverse knowledge of network equipment. I am working to specialize in Network Engineering but retain my passion for new and innovative consumer products, i.e. iPads, iPhones, MacBooks, etc. I, like Steve Jobs, get excited about the convergence of the liberal arts and technology, in order to benefit the average person. I have had the great opportunity to work in environments that give me the opportunity to meet and work with many different kinds of people and deal with drastically different kinds of technology problems, all helping to develop my troubleshooting skills, people skills, and professional development while on the clock.

The Time I Worked an HRC Rally

On Friday, April 18, 2008, it was announced to the students at Wilson High School that Senator Hillary Clinton would be holding a rally in our gymnasium the next day, as part of her Democratic Primary campaign, accompanied by Governor Ed Rendell. For almost a year, I had been a part of my school's media club (TV & Stage Crew), which had streamed numerous football games live on the internet, broadcasted school board meetings on a local cable channel, and recorded countless concerts around the district. One of the women in charge of overseeing our media club, Deb Chestnut, immediately recognized a very unique opportunity for our crew to cover the rally, and worked out with the school and HRC's campaign to allow us to record and broadcast the event on our Comcast cable channel.

At the end of the day on Friday, I entered my 9th period World Cultures class, and was asked by my teacher (who heard about our club's involvement with the event) if I would be coming to work it. I responded "Heck no! I'm not coming into school at 6AM on a Saturday to watch a politician talk." See, I was young, not well informed about current issues, and completely disinterested in politics. I watched for years brief arguments between family members and friends about politics and religion, and saw very little good coming from our political leaders. We were in the midst of a messy war in Iraq following the disaster of 9/11, and I just wasn't up for listening to a politician, whom I knew very little about. The only thing I knew at the time was she was a Democrat, and a lot of my political influencers at that age railed against the Democratic and Republican parties for their inability to accomplish what they say they intend to do, and the constant lies and poor leadership coming from Washington.

Thankfully, my teacher was able to convince me otherwise, and sure enough, Saturday morning I was at the school with 9 other crew members to cover the rally. One or two were big Hillary fans, one or two, if they had been 18, would've been registered Republicans, and the rest of us didn't have much of an opinion one way or the other. 

What a surreal day that was. Being a former First Lady, the Secret Service was setup around the school, canvasing it with bomb sniffing dogs, and guarding every entrance. Metal detectors were setup at the entrance of the gym where people would be coming in for the rally. Working alongside the Secret Service, professional media outlets, and the staff of a Presidential campaign is something I can be really proud of. The biggest Hillary fan in our group, Nathan Schlegel, worked the camera on the floor that day, a few feet from Hillary. He was beyond excited! I worked in the control room running our graphics computer. I remember making a lot of jokes about some of the things she said to start off. That was before the age of Twitter, and one of her ways of gauging engagement and feedback from the crowd was promoting texting a number with the phrase "I support Hillary" or something like that. Of course, I had to be a smart ass and texted "I do not support Hillary" just because I could. It wasn't until about halfway through the rally that I started to really listen, and hear some things that mattered to me, and realized, hey, what she's saying sounds good to me. I don't remember all the specifics, but I do remember her talking about affordable college, because as a sophomore, I was going to be heading off to college in a few years and was worried about how much it would set me and my parents back.

Now, you could've probably put anyone up on that stage and if they said they were for affordable college education, I would've voted for them. If Barack Obama or John McCain had been on that stage saying that, I would've been excited about them, so this is no endorsement for Hillary Clinton. But what is telling about it is that in 2008, she was able to inspire excitement in a 16 year old with hope for a future, which she is having a terribly difficult time doing here in the 2016 race with the overwhelming majority of young voters and millennials, like myself, supporting Vermont Senator, Bernie Sanders. 

I'm not going to explain in detail in this post why I support Bernie over Hillary, but it boils down to Bernie's sincerity, his consistency, and his optimism that what he is campaigning for, he truly believes we can accomplish. In 2008, coming off, less than stellar, 8 years of Republican leadership from George W. Bush, Hillary Clinton was a loud voice for big changes and hope for the future. Here we are in 2016, and while HRC still has plans to further improving health care, working on more affordable college education, combating the countless problems of inequality facing so many Americans, she's running on a platform of gradual (and maybe more realistic) improvements to systems currently in place, thanks to President Obama. But that doesn't strike the same cord like it did when she was talking big change in 2008. Instead, self-proclaimed Democratic-Socialist Bernie Sanders is the one talking about a Political Revolution, raising the minimum wage to $15/hour, universal healthcare, free public college, taking on Wall Street and a corrupt campaign finance system, overcoming climate change, and so many other issues that resonate with so many Americans. He's got the big goals, and sure, some of them are VERY ambitious, and they will be near impossible to achieve with the current Congressional field, but it's the aspirational feeling you get from Bernie that we can't just make small changes, because that won't be enough. Instead, we're going to shoot for the moon, set big goals, and while some, or most, won't fully be achieved, it's the hope that the compromise reached would be a bigger change than the smaller goals HRC is laying out.

Another point I don't think is being made enough, is that Bernie's campaign, a true grass-roots campaign, is completely made possible by individual Americans who are inspired and excited about his message. His message about political revolution is not limited to just getting involved with the Presidential election. It's about getting the average American involved in the political process as a whole. It's about encouraging people to vote at all levels of government, and if he's elected President, and is able to continue to excite his supporters past the election, and get them to vote for members of Congress, which I truly believe is possible, then we'll absolutely be able to change the way politics work for the better. If we get money out of politics, and get the voices of more Americans in, then we'll be able to make the government work for all of us, and not just a few very wealthy individuals.

But circling back to the HRC Rally in 2008, as the rally came to a close, Mrs. Chestnut had one last brilliant idea: a picture with the Senator. After Hillary wrapped up her speech and walked off stage, we all clamored down to the staging area off the gym floor where she would be exiting, and (I'm presuming with approval of the campaign), we got a group photo with Senator Clinton (and one with Governor Rendell). Somehow, I ended up right behind Hillary! So I can't say I'm totally against HRC becoming President, then I could say "I have a picture of me with the President!", but that's all the more reason I have to continue volunteering for Bernie, in hopes that one day, I can actually shake hands with the man I truly want to see be our next Commander in Chief!


Video of the rally from our local newspaper: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CvTUl0gx8JE

Comment

Bryn Behrenshausen

I'm an Information Technology Specialist currently residing in Williamsport, Pennsylvania. I have a passion for integrating technology into people's daily lifestyle and the education process. I believe technology drives innovation and change, for better or worse, but regardless, something will be learned from it. I follow Apple products very closely, but am also very familiar with Windows consumer and Server platforms. Over the past few years I have been developing my enterprise network skills by being exposed to networks running Juniper, Cisco, 3Com, and other network devices, giving me a diverse knowledge of network equipment. I am working to specialize in Network Engineering but retain my passion for new and innovative consumer products, i.e. iPads, iPhones, MacBooks, etc. I, like Steve Jobs, get excited about the convergence of the liberal arts and technology, in order to benefit the average person. I have had the great opportunity to work in environments that give me the opportunity to meet and work with many different kinds of people and deal with drastically different kinds of technology problems, all helping to develop my troubleshooting skills, people skills, and professional development while on the clock.

Guns are Not a Solution

Today, instead of going to the college classes he pays out the nose for, my brother is staying home because of a threat made on a website about an attack on Philly schools following the massacre that occurred last week at Umpqua Community College in Oregon, wherein 10 people were shot, with a gun, execution style. Yesterday, the threat was discovered and the FBI and ATF are currently investigating it, but warned local colleges, urging staff and students to be on "heightened" alert, and to report any suspicious activity. This is not unlike the warnings made my the same agencies following 9/11, not unlike the warnings that are repeated over every loud speaker on a loop in every airport in this country. What does this mean? It means the U.S. is dealing with a terrorism epidemic again, however this time the threat does not come from the Middle East, instead it is within our own borders. 

Our country is once again dividing itself as we approach another Presidential election, and people argue about conservative vs liberal views, religious vs non-religious, right vs left, etc. We argue about immigration reform, healthcare reform, gun control, abortion, marriage equality, police brutality, the list goes on and on. And while it's important that we hear many voices and many opinions, we seem to forget that we need to be able to converse, rather than argue; debate, rather than fight. We are supposed to be a civilized people, but instead we find ourselves trying to shove our opinions, beliefs, and viewpoints down the throats of those who disagree with us. This causes resentment, and hatred towards friends and family, neighbors and coworkers. And then we find ourselves, sitting in stunned disbelief that yet again, someone has snapped, shot up a group of people whom they disagreed with, after accumulating all this hate and resentment, . 

Everyday, we hear Americans making hateful remarks made about different religious groups, rather than trying to honor the founding fathers' ideal of a country that welcomes those of differing faiths, with the idea that together, we could form a more perfect union. Throughout history, no religious group has had all the right answers, and none do to this day. We are continually striving to find the right balance between what is right, and what we believe is right. 

We live in a time where our teachers and students have to practice "death drills", drills for surviving a deranged killer attacking a school with a gun. During World War II, teachers and students practiced "duck and cover" drills, to be prepared for a nuclear attack. It's disgraceful, that in all the advancements we've made since WWII, we still have to be prepared for senseless acts of violence. We've had attacks on schools, churches, and movie theaters, and yet nothing has been done to prevent the amount of gun crimes our country sees every day.

It's been suggested by some, that if every person was able to 1 own a gun, and 2 carry that gun in public, that these kinds of attacks would stop. Their idea relies on people being smart, and thinking, "if I take my gun and attack a school full of children, will there be 1 teacher or 10 with a gun who might stop me first?", and having the forethought to say, "nah, it's not worth the risk." We are NOT dealing with smart, sensible people, we're dealing with people who are having an emotional crisis, where they feel the only thing they can do is cause harm to people, they're not thinking things through first. Almost every car sold today is equipped with an alarm that sounds when the car is broken in to. When was the last time you called the police when you heard a car alarm? Have we stopped all cases of grand theft auto? No, because people who are stealing cars aren't deterred by the possibility that the alarm is going to raise enough attention for the police to be called. No crazed person who shoots up a church is going to be deterred by the possibility of a congregation packing heat, they're going to try to inflict as much harm as they can before they're killed, or they turn the gun on their own self.

Another problem with the idea of every citizen carrying a gun, is our growing problem with police brutality and unfair treatment of minorities. We trust our lives to the men and women who dedicate their lives to protecting others, the men and women we call the Police. We trust that they are trained individuals, who are able to access a situation, and make quick, smart decisions to attain a peaceful resolution, minimizing injury to innocent people. And yet, we see story after story lately, of police slipping up, shooting people who are surrendering, being more forceful than a situation warrants, etc. Now, not to say that everything we hear on the news is fact, the amount of pressure the police have on them is incredible, but we do hold them to a higher standard and they must take assume that responsibility when they pick up the badge. But now, we have people suggesting that everyone should have a gun, and if so, they would be able to end a situation like the one that happened in Oregon before people are shot. But that relies on every citizen who owns a gun to have training and be able to handle a situation like a police officer would, and yet the same people who encourage gun ownership, are saying there should be less regulation on guns, and training should not be required in order to get a permit or buy a gun. This is just a ludicrous way of thinking.

What we need are strickter gun laws, to try to limit the availability of these weapons, and keep them out of the hands of people who have no business possessing them. We require driver training before getting a drivers license, insurance before buying a car, registration of that car so we can assume responsibility for it,  for that car to follow strict environmental standards, speed limits, etc etc. Yet we don't near the amount of regulation for gun ownership, when the primary objective is to either hunt or protect one's family and property, in both cases killing or causing severe harm to the target.

How can we continue to live in a civilized society when we fear the next massacre? How can we expect our students to succeed when so much time is lost to death drills? The time for living in the 18th century is over, we need to be smarter about being protectors and peacekeepers. Shoving a handful of explosive powder down a barrel, pointing it at another human being, and firing is barbaric, and it's time America realizes that.

Comment

Bryn Behrenshausen

I'm an Information Technology Specialist currently residing in Williamsport, Pennsylvania. I have a passion for integrating technology into people's daily lifestyle and the education process. I believe technology drives innovation and change, for better or worse, but regardless, something will be learned from it. I follow Apple products very closely, but am also very familiar with Windows consumer and Server platforms. Over the past few years I have been developing my enterprise network skills by being exposed to networks running Juniper, Cisco, 3Com, and other network devices, giving me a diverse knowledge of network equipment. I am working to specialize in Network Engineering but retain my passion for new and innovative consumer products, i.e. iPads, iPhones, MacBooks, etc. I, like Steve Jobs, get excited about the convergence of the liberal arts and technology, in order to benefit the average person. I have had the great opportunity to work in environments that give me the opportunity to meet and work with many different kinds of people and deal with drastically different kinds of technology problems, all helping to develop my troubleshooting skills, people skills, and professional development while on the clock.

Our Country is Broken

I'm getting more and more concerned every day with the state our country is in. We're seeing story and story and incident after incident of hatred, ignorance, racism, brutality, and lack of respect for our fellow man. The latest story to bring cause for concern is about Ahmed Mohamed, a 14 year old high school freshman in Texas, being falsely arrested after he was accused of bringing a "hoax-bomb" in to school, which in reality was a home-made clock he brought in to show his engineering teacher.

After reading about this story, I, along with many others, took to social media to voice our outrage at the reaction of the Irving Police department. Ahmed was handcuffed, fingerprinted, interrogated, and taken to juvenile detention, all without a parent present, or even notified. 

Let's make something clear, Ahmed did not have the slightest intention of causing a stir at his school, he had no intention of using the device as a hoax bomb, he didn't leave the case containing circuit boards, wire, and a digital display, unattended in a school bathroom, hallway, or locker room, there was absolutely no reason for his project to be thought of as a threat, except that his hame is Ahmed, and he's Muslim. And in a right-wing Texas town, being brown means you're either an illegal or you're a terrorist, and the police responded in a way that they only would for a terrorist situation. 

Now, some people are rushing to defend the procedures of the police in this case, sighting recent devastating incidents at schools, movie theaters, military bases, etc....but what they seem to be forgetting is that in most of those incidents, the weapon was a gun, and the person of threat, was white. But these same people are also the ones arguing for the continued practice of concealed carry, fighting against more stringent background checks for gun permits, etc. I'm so confused! You people are arguing to make it easy for unstable people to get their hands on lethal weapons but a kid brings a science project into school and he must want to blow the it up.

Let me make something perfectly clear, I have the upmost respect for the police. I have friends who are police. I value so much that they are willing to put their lives on the line to keep us safe every day. I find it utterly appalling at the national distrust and disrespect for the badge that so many people seem to have these days. But after incident and incident like this, I can't say I don't see why so many people have a foul opinion of the men and women in blue, especially if they've been victims of poor police action.

What people seem to forget is that we have rules, laws, that have been set in place to make living in our country civilized, and ideally fair for all. The police are here to enforce those rules. They don't make them, they just enforce them. If you get mad at a cop for pulling you over for doing 39 in a 25 MPH zone, don't get mad at the cop, get mad at your local officials who chose to make that a 25 MPH zone. You broke the law, you pay the price.

That said, when police are shooting unarmed people and interrogating 14 year old students without representation, we the people have a right to questions what the hell is going on. Police ARE held to a higher standard, and need to be able to make better, faster, smarter decisions than the average citizen, that's the job they took, that's the responsibility they hold. And when officers referred to Ahmed's clock as "looks like a movie bomb", one really begins to question the decisions made by someone using a 6th grade vocabulary. 

We live in a world of fear, fear of terrorism after the horrific events of 9/11. Because of that, too many people see people of middle-eastern decent immediately as terrorists, and Ahmed was no exception. Many people, including myself, truly believe that the situation would've been handled completely different had he been white. 

The only solace I can take is that so many people supported Ahmed after hearing about the outrageous arrest. Many influential people from the science and tech industry invited Ahmed to their companies, even the President of the United States invited him to the White House.

I think as a people, we're truly trying to be better. I think so many people willing to voice their support for victims in situations like this is promising, but we still have a lot of work to do to help the rest of the people who are still jaded, scared, and ignorant, get rid of the stigmas they hold for people that are different from them. 

As we approach our next Presidential election, there are so many Republican candidates who are still spouting hateful, racists lines about some of the people of the country they want to govern over. People like Donald Trump scare me. How can someone who speaks long before he thinks, be a serious contender for the most respected, and important position in our world? The fact that someone like him, or Sarah Palin, have the respect and backing of so many people is utterly bewildering. 

Our country continues to face extremely difficult problems, and we need a real, solid, leader to tackle them, and Trump is definitely not fit for that kind of responsibility, nor are any of the GOP candidates I've seen to date. With the ever growing national debt, healthcare crisis, economic instability, severe inequality of wealth, a failing education system, crippling infrastructure, race, religion, and gender issues, we need someone who can create real solutions, can lead the nation tactfully, effectively, and who can demand and acquire the respect that the seat of the Presidency deserves and requires. 

And with that, I say, #feelthebern

 

Comment

Bryn Behrenshausen

I'm an Information Technology Specialist currently residing in Williamsport, Pennsylvania. I have a passion for integrating technology into people's daily lifestyle and the education process. I believe technology drives innovation and change, for better or worse, but regardless, something will be learned from it. I follow Apple products very closely, but am also very familiar with Windows consumer and Server platforms. Over the past few years I have been developing my enterprise network skills by being exposed to networks running Juniper, Cisco, 3Com, and other network devices, giving me a diverse knowledge of network equipment. I am working to specialize in Network Engineering but retain my passion for new and innovative consumer products, i.e. iPads, iPhones, MacBooks, etc. I, like Steve Jobs, get excited about the convergence of the liberal arts and technology, in order to benefit the average person. I have had the great opportunity to work in environments that give me the opportunity to meet and work with many different kinds of people and deal with drastically different kinds of technology problems, all helping to develop my troubleshooting skills, people skills, and professional development while on the clock.

WWDC14 Goes Live at 1PM EST

Tune in to Apple.com for live coverage of the WWDC14 keynote, or watch right on you Apple TV from the Apple Events tile!

I'll be doing a writeup later following the Keynote with my analysis and opinions from the event! Check back here later!

Comment

Bryn Behrenshausen

I'm an Information Technology Specialist currently residing in Williamsport, Pennsylvania. I have a passion for integrating technology into people's daily lifestyle and the education process. I believe technology drives innovation and change, for better or worse, but regardless, something will be learned from it. I follow Apple products very closely, but am also very familiar with Windows consumer and Server platforms. Over the past few years I have been developing my enterprise network skills by being exposed to networks running Juniper, Cisco, 3Com, and other network devices, giving me a diverse knowledge of network equipment. I am working to specialize in Network Engineering but retain my passion for new and innovative consumer products, i.e. iPads, iPhones, MacBooks, etc. I, like Steve Jobs, get excited about the convergence of the liberal arts and technology, in order to benefit the average person. I have had the great opportunity to work in environments that give me the opportunity to meet and work with many different kinds of people and deal with drastically different kinds of technology problems, all helping to develop my troubleshooting skills, people skills, and professional development while on the clock.

Breaking into Home Automation [Opinion]

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True home automation would make it easier to keep your home running smoothly and efficiently. It would monitor your heater, air-conditioner, water heater, and air filtration system if you have one, and with iBeacon sensors installed around the house, could detect where more insulation or new windows should be installed to keep the house as efficient as possible when heating in the winter or cooling in the summer.

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iPad Lineup Gets Updated

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Today Apple updated their iPad lineup offerings by killing off the iPad 2 and resurrecting the fourth generation iPad to take its place as the "low end" full size iPad. The iPad 2 was introduced in March, 2011, making the device 3 years old. Since then, we've seen the "new iPad"  that brought Retina to the iPad, replaced 6 months later by the 4th generation iPad, and then this past November we got the iPad Air with the super fast A7 chip and a new form factor.

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